CBS has cancelled infuriatingly inaccurate military drama 'The Code'

Entertainment

The cast of 'The Code'

(CBS photo)

It looks like America broke The Code, and not in a good way.

CBS has decided not to renew the "modestly rated" but notoriously inaccurate military drama for a second season, Deadline reported on Tuesday, just one day after the first season finale.

Dana Delany, who starred as the fictional Col. Glenn Turnbull, shared the news of the cancellation on Twitter. "I'll never make General," she wrote," but I loved this cast of stellar actors & know we'll meet again. Semper Fidelis."


CBS clearly wanted the to find the next JAG in The Code, where "the military's brightest minds take on America's toughest challenges inside the courtroom and out, where each attorney is trained as a prosecutor, a defense lawyer, an investigator—and a Marine," according to the official synopsis.

But based on the critical response of military and veterans observers, The Code focused more on how to inaccurately portray service members than the intricacies of the military justice system. Indeed, the series' pilot episode focused on the court-martial of a Navy O-5 who, inexplicably, appeared in the uniform of an O-3.

Among the other problems:

  • Non-regulation haircuts
  • Erroneous uniforms
  • Excessive rank observation
  • Protocol violations
  • Calling Marines soldiers.
  • NOBODY EVER WEARS THEIR F*CKING COVER

To make matters worse, the short spots that CBS opted to shit out all over social media are so riddled with enough inaccuracies to give even the world's healthiest Marines a stroke. Which is to say nothing of this condescending bullshit:

Marine Corps Times reporter and human dynamo J.D. Simkins put it best: "Across services, more women are integrating into combat arms jobs than ever before, but how on earth could a woman possibly balance duties as an officer and a wedding planner?"

Look, Hollywood and the rest of the entertainment industry frequently make mistakes when it comes to the portrayal of U.S. service members, and it's sometimes understandable given the intricacies of production. But if you're out to replicate the impact of series like JAG, the least you can do is get basic military protocols down.

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