Is That Another Sky Penis Above Another US Military Base?

Mandatory Fun

If there's one thing that helps bridge the civil-military divide between service members and nasty civilians like myself, it's an appreciation of giant dicks drawn in the sky by cocksure aviators.


An airman shared a snapshot in the popular Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook group on Wednesday of what appears to be a half-finished, moderately flaccid sky penis plastered across the gorgeous blue skies above Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska.

Is that ... is that a dick?

Maybe we're just seeing things and the contrail in the photo was simply the byproduct of a standard aviation exercise; maybe I just see dicks everywhere like my therapist keeps telling me.

Or maybe some cocky aviator realized he wouldn't land in much hot water for a wanton sky penis: The two Navy aviators responsible for scrawling a massive sky penis above Okanogan County, Washington, last November were hit with six-month probationary period, the military justice equivalent of scrawling “I will not draw dicks in the sky” on a classroom chalkboard.

So. Is that a sky dick? Or do I just have sky penis on the brain? Either way, I can anticipate what the Pentagon's response might be.

Listen to our 2017 podcast on sky dicks and military humor:

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