Here's The New Navy Slogan That Took 18 Months And Millions Of Dollars To Think Up

Analysis

Buck up, sailors: You’ve been accelerating your life as a global force for good in America’s Navy for a long time now, and it’s time for a new sea-service slogan that works for you. That’s why we’re pleased to inform you that, after 18 months of intensive study and millions of dollars to outside consultants, you are now officially “Forged By The Sea.”


Yep, the Navy’s new marketing slogan, which the branch plans on rolling out in a shiny new ad campaign starting during this Saturday’s Army/Navy football game.

And gosh, is the new Navy slogan ever so neat. It’s already got its own website, with memes and videos and an infographic! And according to the Navy, it’s sure to perform well among the “centennials,” which apparently is a real word real advertisers are using now to describe the youngs.

"The Navy is now recruiting young men and women of the Centennial Generation, who have different goals, expectations and information-gathering habits than their Millennial predecessors," Rear Adm. Pete Garvin, head of Navy Recruiting Command, said in a press release extolling the new “tagline” and “branding campaign” for the naval service. "As such, the Navy recognized the necessity to develop a new marketing campaign and media strategy that more effectively reach, educate and inspire the best-and-brightest prospective recruits."

And just how much does that slick new media strategy cost that cost? Like a half a billion dollars — which sounds like a lot, but that’s barely one-fourth of the cost of a guided missile destroyer, and we’ve gone through a bunch of those already this year.

"If you just look here at our collage of numbers and words, everything will be explained."

The “Forged By The Sea” plan came about in 2016 after the Navy “enlisted a marketing effort led by PR shop, Young & Rubicam,” according to Navy Times. Mind you, this wasn’t your typical enlistment contract, because you probably didn’t get offered $457 million for five years to help the Navy brand itself. But look what it bought: a sketchy-sounding strategy to net those potential “Centennial Generation” recruits!

Never mind that the Navy hasn’t missed its topline recruiting goals since Bill Clinton was president: We have to keep reinventing ourselves for the kids. "What we found was that there was nearly 100 percent awareness of the Navy, but zero percent understanding of the Navy's full mission, reach and influence," a Y&R; managing director said in the Navy’s press release. And how do you inform the young people about what the Navy does? Just tell them: “Forged by the sea.” Done!

The best part of this budget-busting sloganeering effort is that it’s a totally original catchline that no one’s ever thought of — except for the well-received 2012 adult contemporary album “Forged By The Sea” and the Massachusetts jewelry company that trademarked “Forged by the sea” last year. (The Navy applied last week for its own trademark, to use “Forged by the sea” on “Puzzles; Toy airplanes; Toy boats; [and] Scale model airplanes,” according to the Patent Office filing.) And it sounds nothing like the Navy’s 1992 strategy, “...From the Sea,” or its 1994 sequel, “Forward… From the Sea.

Of course, those salty sea dogs who’ve already donned blueberries (or, my God, dungarees) know that there are already plenty of things in the Navy that get “forged by the sea” — like your personnel qualification standards; your eval-time brag sheet; the watch bill; your PCS orders; and the MSDS for that unidentified puddle of chemicals on the deck in your workspace.

Anyway, I could have saved America’s Navy a whole lot of money on that marketing contract. Just steal a page from the Italian sea service, dude:

Soldiers from the 1-118th Field Artillery Regiment of the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team fire an M777 Howitzer during a fire mission in Southern Afghanistan, June 10th, 2019. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jordan Trent)

Once again, the United States and the Taliban are apparently close to striking a peace deal. Such a peace agreement has been rumored to be in the works longer than the latest "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" sequel. (The difference is Keanu Reeves has fewer f**ks to give than U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad.)

Both sides appeared to be close to reaching an agreement in September until the Taliban took credit for an attack that killed Army Sgt. 1st Class Elis A. Barreto Ortiz, of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. That prompted President Donald Trump to angrily cancel a planned summit with the Taliban that had been scheduled to take place at Camp David, Maryland, on Sept. 8.

Now Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen has told a Pakistani newspaper that he is "optimistic" that the Taliban could reach an agreement with U.S. negotiators by the end of January.

Read More
Audie Murphy (U.S. Army photo)

Editor's note: a version of this post first appeared in 2018

On January 26, 1945, the most decorated U.S. service member of World War II earned his legacy in a fiery fashion.

Read More
A Purple Heart (DoD photo)

Florida's two senators are pushing the Defense Department to award Purple Hearts to the U.S. service members wounded in the December shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola.

Read More
Ships from Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 23 transit the Pacific Ocean Jan. 22, 2020. DESRON 23, part of the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group, is on a scheduled deployment to the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Erick A. Parsons)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Navy and Marine Corps need to be a bit more short-sighted when assessing how many ships they need, the acting Navy secretary said this week.

The Navy Department is in the middle of a new force-structure review, which could change the number and types of ships the sea services say they'll need to fight future conflicts. But instead of trying to project what they will need three decades out, which has been the case in past assessments, acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly said the services will take a shorter view.

"I don't know what the threat's going to be 30 years from now, but if we're building a force structure for 30 years from now, I would suggest we're probably not building the right one," he said Friday at a National Defense Industrial Association event.

The Navy completed its last force-structure assessment in 2016. That 30-year plan called for a 355-ship fleet.

Read More
Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Oscar Temores and his family. (GoFundMe)

When Oscar Jesus Temores showed up to work at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story each day, his colleagues in base security knew they were in for a treat.

Temores was a master-at-arms who loved his job and cracking corny jokes.

"He just he just had that personality that you can go up to him and talk to him about anything. It was goofy and weird, and he always had jokes," said Petty Officer 3rd Class Derek Lopez, a fellow base patrolman. "Sometimes he'd make you cry from laughter and other times you'd just want to cringe because of how dumb his joke was. But that's what made him more approachable and easy to be around."

That ability to make others laugh and put people at ease is just one of the ways Temores is remembered by his colleagues. It has been seven weeks since the 23-year-old married father of one was killed when a civilian intruder crashed his pickup truck into Temores' vehicle at Fort Story.

Read More