2 US Army soldiers are reportedly being treated for vaping-related illnesses

popular
VIDEO – Vaping: A Marine Corps Public Service Announcement

Just days after the Army, Navy, and Air Force announced their Exchanges would no longer sell e-cigarette products, two active-duty soldiers are being treated for vaping-related lung illnesses, according to The Wall Street Journal.


Army officials didn't clarify to the WSJ what substances the two soldiers who are being treated used, nor did they discuss any further details about their cases.

In February, Military Times reported that vaping had become more popular with troops than cigarettes — 11.2% of soldiers said they regularly use e-cigarettes. But now those products are not available to soldiers, sailors or airmen at the Exchange, and they aren't allowed to use them (or regular cigarettes) at VA health facilities.

"Until the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments to collect information on e-cigarette and vape products is complete, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is removing these products from its assortment, effective close of business Sept. 30," an AAFES spokesman, Chris Ward, previously told Task & Purpose.

"Confirmed cases and deaths associated with e-cigarette use, or vaping, continue to increase," the Army Public Health Center said in an update on Oct. 8. "Until we know more, everyone is encouraged to not use e-cigarette or vaping products."

As of Oct. 1, 1,080 lung injury cases related to vaping had been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the agency announced on Oct. 3, and 18 deaths had been confirmed in 15 states. The majority of patients are male, and under 35 years old.

"Most patients report a history of using THC-containing products," the CDC said. "The latest national and regional findings suggest products containing THC play a role in the outbreak."

The symptoms that have been reported to the CDC include coughing, shortness of breath, nausea, chest pain, abdominal pain, and more.

(Glow Images via Associated Press)

Editor's Note: This article by Amy Bushatz originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A massive billing glitch in Tricare's East region, managed by Humana, on Thursday slammed about 25,000 beneficiaries with premium charges 100 times more than they owe monthly for their coverage.

Read More Show Less
A UH-60 Black Hawk departs from The Rock while conducting Medevac 101 training with members of the 386th Expeditionary Medical Group, Feb. 16, 2019. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Tech. Sgt. Robert Cloys)

A Minnesota Army National Guard UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter with three Guardsmen aboard crashed south of St. Cloud on Thursday, said National Guard spokeswoman Army Master Sgt. Blair Heusdens.

At this time, the National Guard is not releasing any information about the status of the three people aboard the helicopter, Heusdens told Task & Purpose on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Members of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest neo-Nazi groups in the US, hold a swastika burning after a rally on April 21, 2018 in Draketown, Georgia. (Getty Images/Spencer Platt)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Former Canadian Army Reserve Master Cpl. Patrik Mathews, 26, was first identified as a member of The Base by Winnipeg Free Press reporter Ryan Thorpe.

Days after Thorpe's report was published, Mathews went missing and was discharged from the military for his alleged ties to the group. His car was found about 10 miles from the U.S. border soon thereafter, and police found a cache of weapons when they raided his home.

Vice reporters Ben Makuch, Mack Lamoureux, and Zachary Kamel, citing confidential sources, reported on Thursday that Mathews had been illegally smuggled across the border and is being hidden by members of The Base, which has operated in encrypted chatrooms as a largely online organization.

Read More Show Less

The Pentagon's latest attempt to twist itself in knots to deny that it is considering sending up to 14,000 troops to the Middle East has a big caveat.

Pentagon spokeswoman Alyssa Farah said there are no plans to send that many troops to the region "at this time."

Farah's statement does not rule out the possibility that the Defense Department could initially announce a smaller deployment to the region and subsequently announce that more troops are headed downrange.

Read More Show Less

The Navy could send a second aircraft carrier to the Middle East if President Donald Trump orders a surge of forces to the region, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday said on Thursday.

Gordon Lubold and Nancy Youssef of the Wall Street Journal first reported the United States is considering sending up to 14,000 troops to the Middle East to deter Iran from attacking U.S. forces and regional allies. The surge forces could include several ships.

Read More Show Less