7 US service members identified as part of white nationalist group tied to 2017 Charlottesville rally

news
White supremacists take part in a march the night before the 'Unite the Right' rally in Charlottesville, VA. (Associated Press photo)

Seven U.S. service members have reportedly been identified as members of Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group founded by a Marine veteran and tied to the 2017 Charlottesville rally, according to leaked online chat logs examined by HuffPost.


The logs — which originated from the group chat app Discord and were leaked by the media collective Unicorn Riot —contain messages that, per HuffPost, "indicate that they hold deeply racist and anti-Semitic views and participate in Identity Evropa propaganda campaigns, posting stickers and flyers in cities and on college campuses."

The service members identified by HuffPost include a soldier, two Marines, an airman, a member of the Texas National Guard, and two Army ROTC cadets; each branch of the U.S. armed forces confirmed their respective service.

Identity Evropa, founded by Marine corps veteran Nathan Damigo, was one of several white nationalist groups involved in the violent clashes at the the 2007 'Unite The Right' rally protesting the removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville in 2017.

The investigation comes amid growing concern over white nationalism in the military following the arrest of Coast Guard Lt. Christopher Hasson on drug and gun charges and for planning to "murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country," prosecutors claimed.

A search of Hasson's home in February revealed 15 firearms and over 1,000 rounds of ammo along with a hit list of targets that included prominent liberal Democratic politicians and media personalities.

A 2008 FBI report found that "white supremacist leaders are making a concerted effort to recruit active-duty soldiers and recent combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan," suggesting that most hardcore extremist groups "have some members with military experience, and those with military experience often hold positions of authority within the groups to which they belong."

According to a 2017 Military Times poll weeks after violent clashes at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, more than 30% of service members see white nationalism as a significant threat to national security.

By comparison, only 27% said the same about Syria, 22% for Afghanistan, and 17% for Iraq — results that suggest a fighting force increasingly wary of domestic threats to good order and discipline.

SEE ALSO: Troops See White Nationalism As Bigger Threat To US Than Afghanistan And Iraq

WATCH NEXT: White Nationalists Are Recruiting Veterans For Their Cause

Col. Nicholas Petren, 90th Security Forces Squadron commander, during the 90th SFS change of command ceremony July 6, 2018 in the Peacekeeper High Bay on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming. (U.S. Air Force/Glenn S. Robertson)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Air Force has removed the commander of the 90th Security Forces Squadron at F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming, over a loss of confidence in his ability to maintain a healthy work environment.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Tony Curtis)

Three sailors assigned to the USS George H. W. Bush have died by suicide in the last week, the Navy announced today.

Read More Show Less

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Two rockets were fired on Monday at central Baghdad's fortified Green Zone, which houses foreign embassies and government buildings, but there were no casualties or damage caused, security services said.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the blasts. One rocket exploded inside the Green Zone and another landed in the Tigris river, a statement from Iraqi security services said.

Read More Show Less

An Alaska-based soldier will most likely have a few bucks taken out of next month's paycheck.

Just after midnight on Sunday, the off-duty soldier drove his truck straight into the welcome sign of Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks, Fort Wainwright spokeswoman Eve Baker said in a press release.

Read More Show Less

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The United States will likely move some troops to Poland from elsewhere in Europe, U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday as he and Polish President Andrzej Duda met.

Read More Show Less