Navy SEAL claims he, not Eddie Gallagher, executed ISIS prisoner in Iraq

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Case against Eddie Gallagher in doubt as fellow Navy SEAL says he, not Gallagher, killed prisoner

A Navy SEAL combat medic called as a witness in the trial of Chief Eddie Gallagher claims that it was he, not Gallagher, who was responsible for the death of the ISIS prisoner in Iraq, dealing a massive blow to the U.S. government's case against Gallagher.


SO1 Corey Scott, who was granted immunity to testify for the prosecution, stated in court on Thursday that he put his thumb over the wounded fighter's breathing tube after his capture in Mosul, Iraq, in 2017, resulting in the fighter's death.

Navy spokesman Brian O'Rourke confirmed to Task & Purpose that Scott testified on Thursday that he had asphyxiated the wounded ISIS fighter and was responsible for the man's death.

Scott reportedly said that he knew the fighter "was going to be turned over to the Iraqi forces and that he had previously seen those forces torture, rape and murder prisoners," NBC News reports.

"I knew he was going to die anyway," Scott said. "I wanted to save him from waking up to what had happened next."

Although Scott was a U.S. government witness, Scott was observed by Task & Purpose on Tuesday outside the courtroom talking and joking with Gallagher, who seemed friendly.

The New York Times reports that Scott "had never hinted that he had suffocated the captive," in multiple interviews with Navy investigators. "They said he changed his story after being granted immunity to testify."

"You can stand up there, and you can lie about how you killed the ISIS prisoner so Chief Gallagher does not have to go to jail," Navy prosecutor Lt. Brian John told Scott, per the New York Times.

Jacob Daniel Price (Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office)

An ex-Marine faces premeditated murder charges after admitting to killing his parents and the two family dogs, according to the Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office.

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My brother earned the Medal of Honor for saving countless lives — but only after he was left for dead

"As I learned while researching a book about John, the SEAL ground commander, Cmdr. Tim Szymanski, had stupidly and with great hubris insisted on insertion being that night."

Opinion

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Air Force Master Sgt. John "Chappy" Chapman is my brother. As one of an elite group, Air Force Combat Control — the deadliest and most badass band of brothers to walk a battlefield — John gave his life on March 4, 2002 for brothers he never knew.

They were the brave men who comprised a Quick Reaction Force (QRF) that had been called in to rescue the SEAL Team 6 team (Mako-30) with whom he had been embedded, which left him behind on Takur Ghar, a desolate mountain in Afghanistan that topped out at over 10,000 feet.

As I learned while researching a book about John, the SEAL ground commander, Cmdr. Tim Szymanski, had stupidly and with great hubris insisted on insertion being that night. After many delays, the mission should and could have been pushed one day, but Szymanski ordered the team to proceed as planned, and Britt "Slab" Slabinski, John's team leader, fell into step after another SEAL team refused the mission.

But the "plan" went even more south when they made the rookie move to insert directly atop the mountain — right into the hands of the bad guys they knew were there.

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Sen. Rick Scott is backing a bipartisan bill that would allow service members to essentially sue the United States government for medical malpractice if they are injured in the care of military doctors.

The measure has already passed the House and it has been introduced in the Senate, where Scott says he will sign on as a co-sponsor.

"As a U.S. Senator and member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, taking care of our military members, veterans and their families is my top priority," the Florida Republican said in a statement.

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Little girls everywhere will soon have the chance to play with a set of classic little green Army soldiers that actually reflect the presence of women in the armed forces.

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Turkish and Russian patrol is seen near the town of Darbasiyah, Syria, Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. (Associated Press/Baderkhan Ahmad)

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia landed attack helicopters and troops at a sprawling air base in northern Syria vacated by U.S. forces, the Russian Defence Ministry's Zvezda TV channel said on Friday.

On Thursday, Zvezda said Russia had set up a helicopter base at an airport in the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli, a move designed to increase Moscow's control over events on the ground there.

Qamishli is the same city where Syrian citizens pelted U.S. troops and armored vehicles with potatoes after President Donald Trump vowed to pull U.S. troops from Syria.

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