The Latest 'John Wick' Trailer Has War Dogs, Suave Super Assassins, And A Gunfight On Horseback

Entertainment
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum/IMDB

John Wick doesn't give a fuck. He doesn't care about the rules of fancy hotels. He doesn't care about the odds, considering he's always outnumbered and always ends up the last man standing.

And he definitely doesn't give a damn about traffic laws, made apparent in the new trailer for John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum.


John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum (2019 Movie) Official Trailer – Keanu Reeves, Halle Berry www.youtube.com

Keanu Reeves returns as the titular assassin in the newly released trailer, galloping through a busy intersection on horseback and shooting bad guys in the face like some kind of immortal Custer whose last stand never ended, albeit with better facial hair and style.

Did someone call for the cavalry?John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum/IMDB

The story picks up immediately after the events of John Wick: Chapter 2, with our dapper gunslinger excommunicated from the Continental, a network of safe harbors masquerading as high-priced hotels for hired guns. The trailer doesn't give much away about what's in store for John Wick, just that everyone and their mother is out for his blood — or at least that $14 million dollar bounty on his head.

With nowhere to run, Wick will have to shoot, stab, and kick his way to safety as he tries to escape. Fortunately, this time he'll have some backup from fellow gunslinger Sofia (Halle Berry) and her two kitted out Belgian Malinois, who leap across furniture to mangle a pair of assassins in the short promo. For a franchise that started with a revenge rampage over a slain puppy, the scene — and the prospect of more canine carnage — feels almost poetic.

When John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum hits theaters on May 17, at least this time we know the dogs aren't in any danger, though anyone coming after Wick certainly is.

SEE ALSO: Keanu Reeves Prepares For War In 'John Wick 3: Parabellum'

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