The Marine Corps Now Has Its Own FBI-Approved Concealed Carry Glock

Gear
Marine Corps Systems Command is equipping Marine and civilian CID agents and members of Helicopter Squadron One with the M007.
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Jennifer Napier

It’s ambidextrous, ergonomic, compact and easy to conceal — but for now, this handgun is only available to a few select Marine Corps personnel.


In May, the Marine Corps began issuing the Glock 19M to service members and civilians with the Criminal Investigation Division and those serving with Helicopter Squadron One.U.S. Marine Corps photo

The branch has a new handgun for devil dogs and civilian personnel who require a concealed carry weapon for their day-to-day duties: the Glock 19M pistol, which the service has taken to calling the M007 after James Bond. Smaller than the M9 Beretta it’s meant to  replace, the Corps claims the sidearm is a better fit for those Marines who need to maintain a low profile while remaining armed

“The M007 has a smaller frame and is easier to conceal, making it a natural selection to meet the Marine Corps’ conceal carry weapon requirement,” Gunnery Sgt. Brian Nelson, the Individual Weapons project officer with Marine Corps Systems Command said in a Nov. 8 statement.

After working with the FBI, which adopted the Glock 19M in 2016, the Marines acquired 400 of the handguns in May and began issuing them to service members and civilians with the Corps’ Criminal Investigation Division and those serving with Helicopter Squadron One, also called Marine One, which is tasked with transporting the president.

The M007 comes with a flared magazine well, making it easier to reload, and its grip ditches finger grooves in favor of a textured frame for improved ergonomics and a more comfortable handling experience for a wide range of shooters. It also has an ambidextrous slide and customizeable magazine release, which makes it easily useable by lefties and righties alike.

Beyond the weapon’s specs, it’s the speed of the acquisition that the service is most keen to highlight.

“When we conducted market research, we discovered that the FBI was in the process of buying a new pistol and their test data was very methodical,” a spokesperson for Marine Corps Systems Command told Task & Purpose. “We had never seen a pistol perform to that standard and with such a high level of reliability, the cost estimate over the life of the pistol was paltry.”

Related: The Marine Corps Is On The Hunt For A More Compact Pistol »

Usually, the acquisition process for any piece of gear, let alone a weapon system, takes months if not years from the moment initial requirements are received to the day a new gadget is actually fielded. But by piggybacking on the FBI’s Glock 19M test results, the Corps was able to expedite its requisition process, Lt. Col. Paul Gillikin, the infantry weapons team lead at Systems Command said in the Nov. 8 release.

Individual weapons project officer Gunnery Sgt. Brian Nelson prepares to draw the M007 concealed carry weapon.U.S. Marine Corps photo by Jennifer Napier

“The fielding of the M007 is an example of how we can streamline the acquisition process by reviewing another service or agency’s test data to see if it fits the Marine Corps’ need,” Gillikin said. “We received the initial request for a new concealed carry weapon system in April 2016. By collaborating with the FBI, we were able to procure, establish sustainability plans and start fielding the weapon to Marines by May 2017.”

It’s unclear at this point if the Glock 19M will become the service’s standard pistol — though there have been some rumblings that it might be. Who knows: maybe if the Corps continues to partner with the FBI in its acquisitions, Marines might be able to get their hands on some other other clandestine gear and guns normally used by civilian law enforcement. How about an incognito surveillance van for first sergeants looking to keep eyes and ears on their Marines at all times?

Correction: 11/9/2017; 3:00 PM EST; This article has been corrected to clarify that the magazine well for the Glock 19M is flared.

New London — Retired four-star general John Kelly said that as President Donald Trump's chief of staff, he pushed back against the proposal to deploy U.S. troops to the southern border, arguing at the time that active-duty U.S. military personnel typically don't deploy or operate domestically.

"We don't like it," Kelly said in remarks at the Coast Guard Academy on Thursday night. "We see that as someone else's job meaning law enforcement."

Read More Show Less
Photo: Iran

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Yemen's Houthi rebel group, part of a regional network of militants backed by Iran, claims to be behind the drone strikes on two Saudi oil facilities that have the potential to disrupt global oil supplies.

A report from the United Nations Security Council published in January suggests that Houthi forces have obtained more powerful drone weaponry than what was previously available to them, and that the newer drones have the capability to travel greater distances and inflict more harm.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Air Force has selected two companies to make an extreme cold-weather boot for pilots as part of a long-term effort to better protect aviators from frostbite in emergencies.

In August the service awarded a contract worth up to $4.75 million to be split between Propel LLC and the Belleville Boot Company for boots designed keep pilots' feet warm in temperatures as low as -20 Fahrenheit without the bulk of existing extreme cold weather boots, according to Debra McLean, acquisition program manager for Clothing & Textiles Domain at Air Force Life Cycle Management Command's Agile Combat Support/Human Systems Division.

Read More Show Less

DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran rejected accusations by the United States that it was behind attacks on Saudi oil plants that risk disrupting world energy supplies and warned on Sunday that U.S. bases and aircraft carriers in the region were in range of its missiles.

Yemen's Houthi group claimed responsibility for Saturday's attacks that knocked out more than half of Saudi oil output or more than 5% of global supply, but U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the assault was the work of Iran, a Houthi ally.

Read More Show Less
Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Nearly a decade after he allegedly murdered an unarmed Afghan civilian during a 2010 deployment, the case of Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn is finally going to trial.

Read More Show Less