The Marines Are Buying M27 Rifles At Half Price After Lawmaker Meltdown

Military Tech

Little more than a month after lawmakers threw a temper tantrum about the cost of each M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle, the Marine Corps has announced it is buying the rifles at a much lower cost per weapon.


In total, the Marine Corps plans to buy 15,000 IARs for $29.4 million from Heckler and Koch over the next five years, Marine Corps Systems Command announced on Friday. Of those weapons, the first 5,660 will cost about $1,300 per weapon.

During a March House Armed Services Committee hearing, lawmakers claimed that the M27 would cost about $3,000 per rifle, or roughly four times the $642 per weapon price tag for the M4 carbine, which the IAR s replacing.

“Until the recent award, procurement integrity laws and regulations have restricted pricing details from disclosure,” a MARCORYSSCOM news release says.

Retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Christian Wade has long been an advocate for adopting the M27. In a March 28 op-ed for Task & Purpose, he wrote the Marine Corps has years of anecdotal evidence suggesting Marines are highly confident in the weapon.

“The USMC is a ‘people business' and until we replace Marines with robots with AI, personal confidence is an important factor which contributes to the will of a Marine to fight and to believe his leaders are competent and care for him/her,” the former 2nd Marine Division gunner wrote.

WATCH NEXT:

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Two military bases in Florida and one in Arizona will see heat indexes over 100 degrees four months out of every year if steps aren't taken to reduce carbon emissions, a new study warns.

Read More Show Less

This Veterans Day, two post-9/11 veterans-turned congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation to have a memorial commemorating the Global War on Terrorism built on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Read More Show Less

Between 500 and 600 U.S. troops are expected to remain in Syria when all is said and done, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley said on Sunday.

Milley's comments on ABC News' "This Week" indicate the U.S. military's footprint in Syria will end up being roughly half the size it was before Turkey invaded Kurdish-held northeast Syria last month.

Read More Show Less
Democratic presidential candidate South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a fund-raising fish fry for U.S. Rep. Abby Finkenauer (D-Iowa), Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019, at Hawkeye Downs Expo Center in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Associated Press/Charlie Neibergall)

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — On Veterans Day, Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg is proposing a "veteran-centric" Department of Veterans Affairs that will honor the service of the men and women of the military who represent "the best of who we are and what we can be."

Buttigieg, who served as a Navy intelligence officer in Afghanistan, said service members are united by a "shared commitment to support and defend the United States" and in doing so they set an example "for us and the world, about the potential of the American experiment."

Read More Show Less
Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks during a Climate Crisis Summit with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (not pictured) at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. November 9, 2019. (Reuters/Scott Morgan)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democratic presidential contender Bernie Sanders promised on Monday to boost healthcare services for military veterans if he is elected, putting a priority on upgrading facilities and hiring more doctors and nurses for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

To mark Monday's Veterans Day holiday honoring those who served in the military, Sanders vowed to fill nearly 50,000 slots for doctors, nurses and other medical professionals at facilities run by Veterans Affairs during his first year in office.

Sanders also called for at least $62 billion in new funding to repair, modernize and rebuild hospitals and clinics to meet what he called the "moral obligation" of providing quality care for those who served in the military.

Read More Show Less