Oklahoma attorney general asks Trump to pardon former soldier convicted of murdering Iraqi prisoner

news
In this March 14, 2014, file photo, Michael Behenna, center, is embraced by his brother Brett and girlfriend Shannon Wahl following his release from prison in Leavenworth, Kan. Behenna, who was convicted of killing an Iraqi prisoner, served five years of his 15-year sentence for unpremeditated murder in a combat zone. Oklahoma's Attorney General Mike Hunter is urging President Donald Trump to issue a pardon to Behenna. (Associated Press/The Oklahoman/Sarah Phipps)

The attorney general of Oklahoma has again request President Donald Trump pardon a former Army first lieutenant who was convicted of murdering an Iraqi prisoner while deployed there in 2008.


In a Monday letter to Attorney General William Barr, Oklahoma AG Mike Hunter renewed his request that Trump consider a pardon for former Army Lt. Michael Behenna, who was sentenced in 2009 to 15 years at Fort Leavenworth for the killing of Ali Mansur Mohamed.

According to Hunter, current Justice Department regulations prohibit Behenna, who was released from prison in 2014 after serving less than five years of his sentence, from formally applying for a pardon until 2024.

Behenna allegedly shot and killed Mansur in the desert in retaliation for the Iraqi's alleged connection to an IED attack that left two fellow soldiers dead in April 2008, the Los Angeles Times reported at the time.

The following May, Behenna received military intelligence that identified Mansur as a member of Al Qaeda In Iraq, but two weeks after his capture, Mansur was ordered released due to insufficient evidence of his association with Al Qaeda.

Behenna reportedly grew enraged while attempting to question Mansur about the April IED attack while returning him to his home town, taking him into the desert, shooting him, and placing a live grenade under his head.

Hunter had previously requested a pardon for Behenna in February 2018.

"It's a case ... I have followed and been aware of and never felt the outcome was justified," Hunter told the Associated Press at the time. "When I see something that's not consistent with the basic principles of justice ... I'm going to do my best to protect the interest of the citizens of this state."

Read Hunter's full letter below:

SEE ALSO: Just Kills: How The Marine Corps Blew The Biggest War Crimes Case Since Vietnam

WATCH NEXT: A Navy SEAL Is Accused Of Committing War Crimes In Iraq

Pfc. Kyle Dinsmore gets his turn to use the system during the SBS fielding at Fort Bragg. Photo: Patrick Ferraris/U.S. Army

Those really sweet, hand-held drones that the Army bought in January were finally put to the test as they were fielded to some lucky soldiers for the first time at the beginning of May.

Read More Show Less
Retired Navy Adm. William H. McRaven. (Flickr/Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff/Sean K. Harp)

For many people, millennials are seen as super-entitled, self-involved, over-sensitive snowflakes who don't have the brains or brawn to, among other noble callings, serve as the next great generation of American warfighters.

Retired Navy Adm. William H. McRaven is here to tell you that you have no idea what you're talking about.

Read More Show Less
Rebekah "Moani" Daniel and her husband Walter Daniel. (Walter Daniel/Luvera Law Firm)

The Supreme Court on Monday denied a petition to hear a wrongful death case involving the controversial Feres Doctrine — a major blow to advocates seeking to undo the 69-year-old legal rule that bars U.S. service members and their families from suing the government for injury or death deemed to have been brought on by military service.

Read More Show Less
Fort Irwin's painted rocks in Nov. 25, 2014 (U.S. Army/ Guy Volb)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

FORT IRWIN, California -- Anyone who's been here has seen it: the field of brightly painted boulders surrounding a small mountain of rocks that symbolizes unit pride at the Army's National Training Center.

For nearly four decades, combat units have painted their insignias on boulders near the road into this post. It's known as Painted Rocks.

Read More Show Less

Not just once, but twice, Fox News has asked mobsters how they should fight terrorists. The advice is more or less exactly what you'd expect.

Sure, the Mafia was ultimately unsuccessful in defeating the IRS, but maybe they could have a chance against ISIS.