Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar (U.S. Army photo)

NORFOLK, Va. — Navy Chief Special Warfare Operator Adam Matthews on Thursday pleaded guilty and apologized to the family of Army Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar, a Special Forces soldier who died during a hazing incident in Mali.

Matthews was sentenced to one year in prison, reduction in rank to E-5, and given a bad conduct discharge, although the punitive discharge could be lessened if he testifies against the other service members involved in the case and Melgar's family approves, according to Navy Capt. Michael Luken, the military judge overseeing the case.

Melgar died on June 4, 2017, when Matthews and three other U.S. service members hazed him with the permission of Melgar's team leader.

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Seven Navy SEALs were warned that reporting the alleged war crimes of their teammates and calling for a formal investigation could jeopardize their careers, a Navy criminal investigation report revealed.

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Keanu Reeves doesn't fuck around when it comes to training. For the last several years, there's been a steady trickle of behind-the-scenes clips showing how the actor went from playing space cadets who only seem to know how to look confused and say "whoa" to a bespoke-suited murder machine who once killed a man using just a pencil.

Now, thanks to Vigilance Elite, we can see what new tricks Reeves has up his sleeves when John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum premieres on May 17.

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(U.S. Navy photoo)

Growing evidence suggests that poor sleep habits harm our health, our relationships, even our jobs. So if you're having trouble sleeping, then it's time to get back to the basics — military style.

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A preliminary hearing for two Virginia Beach-based Navy SEALs and two Marine Raiders charged in connection with the 2017 death of an Army Green Beret in Africa has once again been pushed back.

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The judge in the murder trial for Navy SEAL Chief Edward Gallagher has postponed his court-martial for three months at the request of his defense attorneys, a Navy official said Wednesday.

The trial, originally scheduled to begin Feb. 19, will now kick off on May 28, according to Navy spokesman Brian O'Rourke.

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