DOD photo

After a string of high profile incidents, the commander overseeing the Navy SEALs released an all hands memo stating that the elite Naval Special Warfare community has a discipline problem, and pinned the blame on those who place loyalty to their teammates over the Navy and the nation they serve.

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(DoD photo)

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer has expanded a review of the Judge Advocate General Corps to include the Marine Corps, a Navy spokesman said on Thursday.

"There is value in applying this review and its subsequent recommendations across the Department of the Navy," Cmdr. Jereal Dorsey told Task & Purpose. "The review's purpose is to confirm the uniformed legal community is structurally and organizationally sound and best supporting the good order and discipline our integrated naval force."

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U.S. Navy Sea, Air, and Land Team commandos participate in exercise TRIDENT 18-4 at Hurlburt Field, Fla., on July 11, 2018 (U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Corban Lundborg)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Liberty.

The U.S. Navy dismissed charges on August 6 against four SEALs accused of abusing detainees in Afghanistan seven years ago, AP reported.

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(Associated Press/Gregory Bull)

SAN DIEGO — A former attorney for a San Diego-based Navy SEAL acquitted of war crimes is trying to force his former client into arbitration to get paid, according to a complaint obtained by The San Diego Union-Tribune.

In the complaint, Texas-based attorney Colby Vokey says Navy SEAL Petty Officer 1st Class Eddie Gallagher is in breach of a contract he signed in October and Vokey is seeking $200,000 to $1 million in damages. In that contract, also obtained by the Union-Tribune as part of the complaint, Gallagher apparently agreed to go into arbitration should any attorney-client disputes emerge.

Gallagher signed the document Oct. 11.

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(U.S. Army photo)

NORFOLK, Va. -- They called it Operation Tossed Salad and the hasty plan, concocted over several hours at various clubs in Bamako, Mali, was to haze an Army Green Beret.

Instead, Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar died sometime in the early morning of June 4, 2017, after four special operators broke into his room while he was sleeping, taped him up, placed him in a chokehold, then tried to cover up their actions. On Monday, a Navy SEAL and Marine Raider, the last of four service members currently charged in the case, made their first court appearances in front a preliminary hearing officer at Naval Station Norfolk, who will help determine whether there is enough evidence for the military to pursue the case.

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