Clueless Journalist Gets Dragged For Saying 'America Isn't At War' In Election Day Tweet

Analysis

Journalist Ezra Klein thinks America isn't at war. A lot of people on the internet (and the staff of Task & Purpose) disagree.


Klein, the founder and editor-at-large for Vox.com, made the claim in a tweet about the mid term election on Tuesday, opining on why the Democrats took the House of Representatives. Comparing 2018 to 2008 — when Democrats took power amid a war in Iraq and Afghanistan — Klein argued that the Tuesday election was a "pure repudiation" of Trump, since unemployment was so low and America was no longer at war.

Twitter

The only problem, of course, is that America is still at war in the same places it was in 2008, in Iraq and Afghanistan — albeit with a smaller footprint. And U.S. troops are still fighting and dying there: On the same day as Klein's tweet, the remains of Army Maj. Brent Taylor touched down at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware; he was killed Saturday in Afghanistan, leaving behind a wife and seven children.

And since 2008, the U.S. military has become involved in more places, carrying out airstrikes and engaging in firefights with militants in places like Somalia, Mali, and Tunisia. Then there was a battle with ISIS militants in Niger in October 2017, where four Americans were killed in the most deadly incident for U.S. troops in Africa since the 1993 "Black Hawk Down" incident.

Technically, Congress hasn't "declared war" and America is not in a state of war. But it certainly feels like war to the U.S. troops getting shot at in Syria or in Afghanistan. Indeed, when Vox itself describes what's happening in Afghanistan these days, the war is described as "America's longest war" — an accurate assessment for a conflict that continues 17 years and one month after the invasion that kicked it off.

Which is probably why Klein got dragged up and down the Twitter-sphere by soldiers, national security journalists, and everyone in between.

Here's a sampling:

Editor's note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

On Aug. 16, two 7-ton trucks collided aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California. Thirty Marines were sent to the hospital.

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For U.S. service members who have fought alongside the Kurds, President Donald Trump's decision to approve repositioning U.S. forces in Syria ahead of Turkey's invasion is a naked betrayal of valued allies.

"I am ashamed for the first time in my career," one unnamed special operator told Fox News Jennifer Griffin.

In a Twitter thread that went viral, Griffin wrote the soldier told her the Kurds were continuing to support the United States by guarding tens of thousands of ISIS prisoners even though Turkey had nullified an arrangement under which U.S. and Turkish troops were conducting joint patrols in northeastern Syria to allow the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, to withdraw.

"The Kurds are sticking by us," the soldier told Griffin. "No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us."

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MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia announced on Monday it would hold a large test of its Strategic Missile Forces that will see it fire ballistic and cruise missiles from the land, sea and air this week.

The exercise, from Oct. 15-17, will involve around 12,000 military personnel, as well as aircraft, including strategic nuclear bombers, surface ships and submarines, Russia's Ministry of Defense said in a statement.

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Glock may have walked away from the U.S. Army's turbulent Modular Handgun System competition licking its wounds, but that doesn't mean other core NATO partners are following the Pentagon's lead when it comes to new sidearms.

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WASHINGTON, DC — Textron Systems, its subsidiary Howe & Howe, and FLIR Systems, Inc. unveiled their bid for a new Army robotic combat vehicle Monday — the Ripsaw M5, a well-armed tracked vehicle equipped with high-end sensors that can deploy unmanned air and ground assets like a drone mothership.

This robotic combat vehicle design was on display Monday at the Association of the United States Army conference in Washington, DC.

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