Airman dies in non-combat incident in Qatar

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A U.S. Air Force carry team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Albert J. Miller, of Richmond, New Hamphire, April 21, 2019, at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. Miller was assigned to the 736th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Dover AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Mauricio Campino)

A Dover-based airman deployed to Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar died on April 19 in a non-combat related incident, defense officials announced on Monday.

Staff Sgt. Albert J. Miller, 24, was supporting U.S. operations in Afghanistan while assigned to the 736th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron at the time of his death, according to the Pentagon.


No information about the circumstances surrounding his death were immediately available. The incident is under investigation.

Miller, of Richmond, New Hampshire, had served as a C-17 Globemaster III crew chief at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, for more than four years, said Col. Joel Safranek, commander of the 436th Airlift Wing.

"The 436th Airlift Wing extends its deepest sympathies and heartfelt condolences to the Miller family, friends and fellow airmen. Staff Sergeant Albert Miller's passing is a true loss for Dover Air Force Base and the Air Force," Safranek, said in a statement.

"He was a positive force in his unit and made valuable contributions to multiple contingency and humanitarian operations around the world. He will be missed by all."

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