The Maker Of The AK-47 Just Released Footage Of Its Robot Tank In Action

Gear

Kalashnikov Concern may be known for its ubiquitous and durable AK-47 assault rifle, but the Russian defense contractor’s been cooking up some other exciting weaponry and vehicles in recent months. A slick new handgun! A pop-up riot shield! Toy guns, even!


But the most exciting futuristic murder gadget on the legendary weapons manufacturer’s radar might be its BAS-01G Soratnik “Comrade-in-Arms,” an autonomous unmanned combat vehicle designed to tear assholes every which way — at least, according to a new sizzle reel published on March 6.

With a top speed of 25 mph and maximum range of roughly six miles, the seven-ton tank-like murderbot isn’t nearly as fast or imposing as, say, the beloved M1 Abrams. But she’s semi-autonomous — i.e. not putting living, breathing humans in harm's way — and she definitely packs a wallop beyond the 12.7mm main gun.

The video shows what looks like a 30mm AGS-17 automatic grenade launcher mounted on the Soratnik’s turret. In addition, this Death Cab For Putin has four weapons stations, offering space for armaments that include a 7.62mm machine gun, various hand-grenade launchers, and potentially up to eight Kornet-EM anti-tank missiles. That’s a whole lot of boom for one little bot.

None

The Soratnik isn’t a first-of-its-kind robotank: A Russian defense contractor unveiled the Uran-9 multipurpose unmanned ground combat vehicle, designed for fire support and recon operations, back in 2016; the U.S. Army was prototyping the so-called “Black Knight” semi-autonomous skull-crusher with BAE Systems way back in 2007. But to see this bad boy blowing shit up on a test range is, well, delightful — and horrifying.

There’s one big question, though: Can it Build The Wall?

WATCH NEXT:

Want to read more from Task & Purpose? Sign up for our daily newsletter »

Navy photo.

The Navy has identified the missing sailor from the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln as Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Slayton Saldana, who was assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 5, with Carrier Air Wing 7.

Read More Show Less
(Reuters/Nick Oxford)

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force has suspended paying incentive fees at all 21 military housing bases operated by landlord Balfour Beatty Communities following a Reuters-CBS News report that the company falsified maintenance records at an Oklahoma base to help it qualify for millions of dollars in bonuses.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Marine Corpss/Staff Sgt. Bryan Nygaard)

The wait is over: the Marine Corps's brand new sniper is officially ready for action.

The Mk13 Mod 7 sniper rifle reached full operational capacity earlier this year after extensive testing, Marine Corps Systems Command announced on Wednesday. Now, the new rifle is finally available in both scout snipers and recon Marine arsenals.

Read More Show Less
(Reuters/Lisi Niesner)

DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran announced on Monday it had captured 17 spies working for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and sentenced some of them to death, deepening a crisis between the Islamic Republic and the West.

Iranian state television published images that it said showed the CIA officers who had been in touch with the suspected spies.

In a statement read on state television, the Ministry of Intelligence said 17 spies had been arrested in the 12 months to March 2019. Some have been sentenced to death, according to another report.

Read More Show Less
Photo by: Christoph Hardt/Geisler-Fotopres/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images.

One of the few things that aggravates your friend and humble narrator more than hazelnut flavored coffee is Soviet apologists.

Case in point: A recent opinion piece in the New York Times claims the Soviet space program was a model for equality, noting the Soviets put a woman into space 20 years before NASA when Cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova orbited the Earth in 1963.

"Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up," wrote Sophie Pinkham just in time for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

Read More Show Less