The Youngest And Oldest Living Marine Medal Of Honor Recipients Met, And This Epic Photo Is The Result

Code Red News

The Medal of Honor Convention is currently taking place in Annapolis, Md., and it has brought together the youngest and oldest living Marine recipients of our nation's highest award for battlefield heroism in a photograph of epic proportions.


In a post on Twitter on Thursday, retired Marine Cpl. Kyle Carpenter, 28, said that he was "beyond humbled and honored" upon meeting with retired Marine Chief Warrant Officer-4 Hershel "Woody" Williams, 94, at the conference.

"As the youngest living recipient I can only hope to one day live up to his legacy," Carpenter added.

Born Oct. 2, 1923, Williams was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II at the Battle of Iwo Jima. On Feb. 23, 1945, then-Cpl. Williams, a demolition sergeant, repeatedly charged alone toward concrete pillboxes where the Japanese were firing machine guns in order to "wipe out one position after another" with explosive charges and flamethrowers.

"On one occasion, he daringly mounted a pillbox to insert the nozzle of his flamethrower through the air vent, killing the occupants and silencing the gun; on another he grimly charged enemy riflemen who attempted to stop him with bayonets and destroyed them with a burst of flame from his weapon," his citation reads.

Carpenter, born on Oct. 19, 1989, was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism during the Battle of Marjah on Nov. 21, 2010, in which he threw himself on an enemy grenade that had landed on a rooftop security post, saving the life of a fellow Marine.

"Carpenter moved toward the grenade in an attempt to shield his fellow Marine from the deadly blast," the award citation reads. "When the grenade detonated, his body absorbed the brunt of the blast, severely wounding him, but saving the life of his fellow Marine."

Carpenter nearly died from the grenade shrapnel, which tore into his face and body. He lost his right eye and many of his teeth, and has undergone dozens of surgeries since.

When asked whether he would have done anything differently during an interview with this reporter in 2014, he jokingly replied, "I mean I would grab that [grenade] and kick it right back.'

"But besides that ... I wouldn't change anything," he added. "We're both alive and we're here and I'm fully appreciating my second chance."

Correction: The post and headline previously stated Williams was the oldest living Medal of Honor of recipient, which is incorrect. Former soldier Robert D. Maxwell, 97, is currently the oldest living recipient. Williams is actually the oldest living Marine recipient. This has been corrected and we apologize for the error.

Kyle Carpenter/Twitter
(U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. Ken Scar)

SEOUL (Reuters) - The South Korean military fired two warning shots at a Russian military aircraft that entered South Korean airspace on Tuesday, the Ministry of National Defense in Seoul said, and Chinese military aircraft had also entered South Korean airspace.

It was the first time a Russian military aircraft had violated South Korean airspace, a ministry official said.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army/Capt. Richard Barke)

First, America had to grapple with the 'storm Area 51' raid. Now black helicopters are hovering ominously over Washington, D.C.

Bloomberg's Tony Capaccio first reported on Monday that the Army has requested $1.55 million for a classified mission involving 10 UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters and a “Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility" at Fort Belvoir, Va.

Read More Show Less
(Facebook photo)

Camesha Walters was a petty officer 3rd class living in Norfolk. Her husband was a foreign national living in Bangladesh.

But to boost her take home pay, Walters told the Navy in 2015 her husband was a U.S. citizen living in Brooklyn, N.Y. She said she needed larger housing and cost of living allowances to support him.

Walters, 37, was sentenced Friday to five months in jail on charges she stole almost $140,000 from the federal government.

Following her release, she will be on house arrest for six months. She also must perform 200 hours of community service and pay full restitution.

Read More Show Less
(Shit My LPO says 4)

If it looks too good to be true, chances are it probably is.

Read More Show Less

In a not-so-veiled threat to the Taliban, President Donald Trump argued on Monday the United States has the capacity to bring a swift end to the 17-year-old war in Afghanistan, but he is seeking a different solution to avoid killing "10 million people."

"I have plans on Afghanistan that if I wanted to win that war, Afghanistan would be wiped off the face of the Earth," Trump said on Monday at the White House. "It would be gone. It would be over in – literally in 10 days. And I don't want to do that. I don't want to go that route."

Read More Show Less