Airmen Who Protected US Missile Silos Were Tripping On LSD Between Shifts

Bullet Points

At least 14 airmen assigned to one of the Air Force security units which guard the Pentagon's nuclear missile silos were disciplined for consuming and distributing LSD and other illicit drugs "as part of a ring that operated undetected for months" at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming, the Associated Press reported on Thursday. Six were convicted at court-martial, while another deserted for Mexico.


  • The so-called drug ring, discovered in March 2016 by Air Force investigators, involved airmen from the 90th Missile Wing responsible for overseeing dozens of Minuteman III nuclear missile silos across the northwestern United States that are constantly on alert for incoming threats.
  • Documents obtained via FOIA "tell a sordid tale of off-duty use of LSD, cocaine and other drugs in 2015 and 2016 by airmen who were supposed to be held to strict behavioral standards because of their role in securing the weapons," according to the Associated Press. One airman told investigators that he "felt paranoia, panic” for hours after taking a hit of acid.
  • It's the latest embarrassing incident to mar the image of the Air Force's nuclear missile corps after personnel with the 91st Security Forces Group with at Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota reportedly lost a belt of rounds for a Mk 19 automatic grenade launcher and an M20 machine gun. On May 23, 91st commander Col. Jason Beers was relieved "due to a loss of trust and confidence after a series of events under the scope of his leadership, including a recent loss of ammunition and weapon."
  • Rest easy, though! Air Force spokesman, Lt. Col. Uriah L. Orland assured the Associated Press that "there are multiple checks to ensure airmen who report for duty are not under the influence of alcohol or drugs and are able to execute the mission safely, securely and effectively."

But even though the airmen involved were not accused of using drugs while on duty, the risk of diminishing capacity remains alarming given the essential role of the nuclear missile corps — especially with the entire world currently pissed off at the United States.

WATCH NEXT:

U.S. Air Force
(U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. Ken Scar)

SEOUL (Reuters) - The South Korean military fired two warning shots at a Russian military aircraft that entered South Korean airspace on Tuesday, the Ministry of National Defense in Seoul said, and Chinese military aircraft had also entered South Korean airspace.

It was the first time a Russian military aircraft had violated South Korean airspace, a ministry official said.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army/Capt. Richard Barke)

First, America had to grapple with the 'storm Area 51' raid. Now black helicopters are hovering ominously over Washington, D.C.

Bloomberg's Tony Capaccio first reported on Monday that the Army has requested $1.55 million for a classified mission involving 10 UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters and a “Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility" at Fort Belvoir, Va.

Read More Show Less
(Facebook photo)

Camesha Walters was a petty officer 3rd class living in Norfolk. Her husband was a foreign national living in Bangladesh.

But to boost her take home pay, Walters told the Navy in 2015 her husband was a U.S. citizen living in Brooklyn, N.Y. She said she needed larger housing and cost of living allowances to support him.

Walters, 37, was sentenced Friday to five months in jail on charges she stole almost $140,000 from the federal government.

Following her release, she will be on house arrest for six months. She also must perform 200 hours of community service and pay full restitution.

Read More Show Less
(Shit My LPO says 4)

If it looks too good to be true, chances are it probably is.

Read More Show Less

In a not-so-veiled threat to the Taliban, President Donald Trump argued on Monday the United States has the capacity to bring a swift end to the 17-year-old war in Afghanistan, but he is seeking a different solution to avoid killing "10 million people."

"I have plans on Afghanistan that if I wanted to win that war, Afghanistan would be wiped off the face of the Earth," Trump said on Monday at the White House. "It would be gone. It would be over in – literally in 10 days. And I don't want to do that. I don't want to go that route."

Read More Show Less