It Took The Army 4 Years To Field The JLTV. It Took Soldiers 4 Days To Total One

Military Tech

It took four years for the Army to finally start fielding the much-hyped Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, and it took soldiers less than four days to destroy one.


Soldiers with the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Stewart in Georgia received the first of its 500 JLTVs on Jan. 14.

A few days later, a photo surfaced on U.S. Army WTF! Moments showing what appeared to be one of the Raider Brigaide's brand new vehicles on its side in the aftermath of a rollover, hood open and parts spilling onto the pavement.

Luckily, nobody was injured in the rollover, which occurred during Operator New Equipment Training on the tank trails at Fort Stewart, 1st ABCT public affairs officer Maj. Pete Bogart told Task & Purpose on Tuesday.

Even better: the JLTV involved in the rollover doesn't even belong to the 1st ABCT. According to Bogart, it's a loaner vehicle from Oshkosh sent to Fort Stewart along with the ABCT's current fleet of 8-10 JLTVs explicitly for master drivers and senior NCOs to get a feel for it.

"They handle differently than the Humvee, and they handle differently than the MRAP," Bogart said. "There's a level of finding our comfort zones in driving because it's not something we've ever handled before."

Master drivers are currently going through two 40-hour courses spread over five days before the JLTV is fielded on the unit level around the beginning of February, Bogart said. And so far, the reviews are overwhelmingly positive.

"The main comment is how smooth the ride is," Bogart said. "When you're hitting bumps, it feels more like a passenger car. .. [soldiers] are blown away by how smooth it is."

"It's really exciting to be the first to try out [the JLTV]," he added. "I came into the Army in 2001, and all we've ever had was Humvees. Our guys are excited for it, the maintenance and training guys are excited for it ... we're all excited."

Beyond the Army, the Marine Corps planned on fielding 69 JLTVs to an infantry battalion with II Marine Expeditionary Force at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. God knows how many of those will survive their first week.

SEE ALSO: A Few Lucky Soldiers Are Finally Getting Their Hands On The New JLTV

WATCH NEXT: Meet The JLTV

Human civilization is about fire. Creating fire is what separates us from the animals; extinguishing it without urinating on it, according to Sigmund Freud, marked the starting point for the most fundamental societies. It is also, at its core, a force of destruction — and, therefore, a weapon of war.

Anyway.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. True Thao)

Army researchers have devised a method to produce ceramic body armor, lightweight but strong, from a 3D printer. Except that 3D printers are meant to print out knickknacks, not flak jackets — which meant that engineers had to hack into the printer to get the job done.

Read More Show Less

There are #squadgoals, and then there are squad goals — and only one of them includes a potential future accompanied by autonomous murderbots.

Hot on the heels of the Marine Corps's head-to-toe overhaul of infantry rifle squads, a handful of grunts at the Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms, California recently conducted field testing alongside a handful of autonomous robots engineered by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Squad X Experimentation program.

Read More Show Less
Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher dodged the most serious charges the Navy threw at him during his court martial, but his final sentence could be far worse than what the jury originally handed down.

If the convening authority approves the jury's sentence of four months' confinement and a reduction in rank from E7 to E6, Gallagher will be busted down to the rank of E1, according to Navy officials.

Read More Show Less

An otherwise sleepy confirmation hearing for Defense Secretary nominee Mark Esper was jolted from its legislative stupor after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) grilled the former Raytheon lobbyist on ethical issues regarding his involvement with his former employer.

Read More Show Less