Two Married Marines Went To The Corps' Birthday Ball. Now He's Charged With Murder

news
Arlington County Police/Facebook

Police have arrested a man who allegedly murdered his wife some time after they both attended their unit's Marine Corps Birthday Ball on Friday, Task & Purpose has learned.


Arlington County Police officers found 20-year-old Marine Lance Cpl. Natasha Rivera dead inside a hotel room in Crystal City on Saturday at about 9:40 a.m. Her husband, Cpl. Rodolfo Rivera, 24, was arrested at the scene and has been charged with murder.

The arrest was announced as a "domestic-related homicide," according to a police statement. Rivera is being held without bond in the Arlington County Detention Facility, police said.

Both Marines lived in Stafford, Virginia and were assigned to Headquarters and Service Battalion in the legal services support section at Marine Corps Base Quantico as legal services specialists. They both attended their base's birthday ball together on Friday evening at the Crystal Gateway Marriott hotel, a source familiar with the matter told Task & Purpose.

The victim, whose maiden name is Soto, had just given birth to a baby boy in September and was still on maternity leave, according to the source.

"We are shocked and saddened by this tragic loss. Our deepest sympathies are extended to the Marines and families involved," Maj. Ken Kunze, a MCB Quantico spokesman, told Task & Purpose in a written statement.

Kunze added that base officials were notified of the alleged murder and arrest on Saturday and were cooperating fully with the investigation, which is being carried out by the Arlington Police Department and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

According to Marine Corps records, Quantico was both Marines' first duty station and neither had ever deployed. Their only awards were the National Defense Service Medal and the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

Rodolfo enlisted from Cook County, Illinois on March 14, 2016; Natasha enlisted from Brooklyn, New York on April 17, 2017.

A friend of Natasha's who went to boot camp with her has started a GoFundMe campaign for her family to pay for expenses and to help raise her infant son. "She had such a great presence," wrote Olivia Golden. "Anything you can offer will help immensely."

Correction: A previous version of this article said both Marines were assigned to legal assistance branch. It has been changed to reflect that they were assigned to legal services support section.

"It's kind of like the equivalent of dropping a soda can into canyon and putting on a blindfold and going and finding it, because you can't just look down and see it," diver Jeff Goodreau said of finding the wreck.

The USS Eagle 56 was only five miles off the coast of Maine when it exploded.

The World War I-era patrol boat split in half, then slipped beneath the surface of the North Atlantic. The Eagle 56 had been carrying a crew of 62. Rescuers pulled 13 survivors from the water that day. It was April 23, 1945, just two weeks before the surrender of Nazi Germany.

The U.S. Navy classified the disaster as an accident, attributing the sinking to a blast in the boiler room. In 2001, that ruling was changed to reflect the sinking as a deliberate act of war, perpetuated by German submarine U-853, a u-boat belonging to Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine.

Still, despite the Navy's effort to clarify the circumstances surrounding the sinking, the Eagle 56 lingered as a mystery. The ship had sunk relatively close to shore, but efforts to locate the wreck were futile for decades. No one could find the Eagle 56, a small patrol ship that had come so close to making it back home.

Then, a group of friends and amateur divers decided to try to find the wreck in 2014. After years of fruitless dives and intensive research, New England-based Nomad Exploration Team successfully located the Eagle 56 in June 2018.

Business Insider spoke to two crew members — meat truck driver Jeff Goodreau and Massachusetts Department of Corrections officer Donald Ferrara — about their discovery.

Read More Show Less
(CIA photo)

Before the 5th Special Forces Group's Operational Detachment Alpha 595, before 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment's MH-47E Chinooks, and before the Air Force combat controllers, there were a handful of CIA officers and a buttload of cash.

Read More Show Less

The last time the world saw Marine veteran Austin Tice, he had been taken prisoner by armed men. It was unclear whether his captors were jihadists or allies of Syrian dictator Bashar al Assad who were disguised as Islamic radicals.

Blindfolded and nearly out of breath, Tice spoke in Arabic before breaking into English:"Oh Jesus. Oh Jesus."

That was from a video posted on YouTube on Sept. 26, 2012, several weeks after Tice went missing near Damascus, Syria, while working as a freelance journalist for McClatchy and the Washington Post.

Now that Tice has been held in captivity for more than seven years, reporters who have regular access to President Donald Trump need to start asking him how he is going to bring Tice home.

Read More Show Less

"Shoots like a carbine, holsters like a pistol." That's the pitch behind the new Flux Defense system designed to transform the Army's brand new sidearm into a personal defense weapon.

Read More Show Less

Sometimes a joke just doesn't work.

For example, the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service tweeted and subsequently deleted a Gilbert Gottfried-esque misfire about the "Storm Area 51" movement.

On Friday DVIDSHUB tweeted a picture of a B-2 bomber on the flight line with a formation of airmen in front of it along with the caption: "The last thing #Millenials will see if they attempt the #area51raid today."

Read More Show Less