This is what happens when you strap a head-tracking rifle turret to a jet pack

Military Tech

VIDEO: A jet suit with a head-tracking shoulder turret from Gravity Industries

Royal Marine reservist turned inventor Richard Browning's jet-powered Daedalus Mark 1 exoskeleton has earned him a reputation as a "real-life Iron Man," but the latest addition to his flying suit is a bit more akin to Col. James Rhodes' War Machine armor.


A YouTube video published on Oct. 7 shows Browning operating the Deadalus exoskeleton with a shoulder-mounted weapons turret consisting of a select-fire airsoft rifle controlled through movements of the suit's helmet, not unlike the helmet-mounted displays currently employed by the U.S. armed forces

The shoulder turret was fabricated by James Bruton, an engineer and 3D-printing expert, although Guns.com notes that Browning company Gravity Industries "made it clear that the addition of the weapon is merely for entertainment reasons only."

And with good reason: As you can tell from the video, the rifle turret's current configuration doesn't yet have the clearance to avoid potentially injuring an operator when rocking live ammo. Still, the sight of a shoulder-mounted weapons turret on an ostensible flying suit is exciting to watch.

Browning has been a busy bee in recent months when it comes to potential military applications of his tech. In late July, Gravity Industries conducted a short test flight from the Royal Navy's HMS Dasher (P280), launching from the patrol using his six-turbine rig and training vessel to a smaller rubber motorboat before circling the two.

"Being in command of Dasher while the Gravity Industries team were onboard was very different and a new challenge which I was honored to take on," Lieutenant Lauren Webber said in a statement at the time "Taking off and landing on the P2000 [Archer-class vessel] look so easy, despite the ship traveling at 20 knots."

The previous May, personnel from 539 Assault Squadron, 1 Assault Group Royal Marines (1AGRM) — the training unit responsible for small boat amphibious and riverine operations — tested out the Browning's jet-powered suit as part of its mission to reimagine the future of amphibious assaults.

"This has been about exploring how we can take surface [maneuver] forward and all the different technologies that are out there," as 1AGRM's commanding officer Col. Chris Haw told Maritime Executive at the time.

Does this mean that Royal Marines will start flying armed Daedalus jetpacks into battle? It seems unlikely at the moment, but it's good to see that the dreams of a real-life War Machine armor are alive and well.

In this March 12, 2016, file photo, Marines of the U.S., left, and South Korea, wearing blue headbands on their helmets, take positions after landing on a beach during the joint military combined amphibious exercise, called Ssangyong, part of the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle military exercises, in Pohang, South Korea. (Associated Press/Yonhap/Kim Jun-bum)

BANGKOK (Reuters) - The United States and South Korea said on Sunday they will postpone upcoming military drills in an effort to bolster a stalled peace push with North Korea, even as Washington denied the move amounted to another concession to Pyongyang.

The drills, known as the Combined Flying Training Event, would have simulated air combat scenarios and involved an undisclosed number of warplanes from both the United States and South Korea.

Read More Show Less

An opening ceremony will be held Monday on Hawaii island for a military exercise with China that will involve about 100 People's Liberation Army soldiers training alongside U.S. Army counterparts.

This comes after Adm. Phil Davidson, head of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, spoke on Veterans Day at Punchbowl cemetery about the "rules-based international order" that followed U.S. victory in the Pacific in World War II, and China's attempts to usurp it.

Those American standards "are even more important today," Davidson said, "as malicious actors like the Communist Party of China seek to redefine the international order through corruption, malign cyber activities, intellectual property theft, restriction of individual liberties, military coercion and the direct attempts to override other nations' sovereignty."

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Sunday told North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to "act quickly" to reach a deal with the United States, in a tweet weighing in on North Korea's criticism of his political rival former Vice President Joe Biden.

Trump, who has met Kim three times since 2018 over ending the North's missile and nuclear programs, addressed Kim directly, referring to the one-party state's ruler as "Mr. Chairman".

In his tweet, Trump told Kim, "You should act quickly, get the deal done," and hinted at a further meeting, signing off "See you soon!"

Read More Show Less

It is impossible to tune out news about the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump now that the hearings have become public. And this means that cable news networks and Congress are happier than pigs in manure: this story will dominate the news for the foreseeable future unless Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt get back together.

But the wall-to-wall coverage of impeachment mania has also created a news desert. To those of you who would rather emigrate to North Korea than watch one more lawmaker grandstand for the cameras, I humbly offer you an oasis of news that has absolutely nothing to do with Washington intrigue.

Read More Show Less

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia will return three captured naval ships to Ukraine on Monday and is moving them to a handover location agreed with Kiev, Crimea's border guard service was cited as saying by Russian news agencies on Sunday.

A Reuters reporter in Crimea, which Russian annexed from Ukraine in 2014, earlier on Sunday saw coastguard boats pulling the three vessels through the Kerch Strait toward the Black Sea where they could potentially be handed over to Ukraine.

Read More Show Less