Army recruiters will be the only ones rocking the new 'pink and greens' uniform for a while

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Army Sgt. Maj. Dan Dailey with Soldier models wearing the proposed Pink & Green uniform. Photo: SFC Ron Lee/U.S. Army

A few lucky soldiers could get their hands on — or rather, in — the Army's new everyday uniform this month.


  • Two hundred of the WWII-era uniforms, previously known as "pink and greens" but now called Army Greens, will start rolling out to Army recruiters this month, per Stars & Stripes.
  • New soldiers won't actually get the uniforms until 2020 after basic training, but screw it: the Army has a renewed focus on recruitment this year and damnit, they want their recruiters looking sharp.
  • Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Dailey said the general public recognizes the Army Greens, and identifies the uniform "with the greatest generation," Stars & Stripes reports. While soldiers will still don their dress blue uniforms for special occasions, the new uniform will be the everyday office uniform.
  • The throwback uniform will be mandatory for every soldier by 2028. They currently cost more than the current uniforms, but they're expected to be higher quality and last longer.

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