Warfighting with the backup squad: 20 of the Pentagon's top officials are in temp or acting roles

Analysis
An aerial view of the Pentagon building in Washington, June 15, 2005. U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld defended the Guantanamo prison against critics who want it closed by saying U.S. taxpayers have a big financial stake in it and no other facility could replace it at a Pentagon briefing on Tuesday. (Reuters/Jason Reed JIR/CN)

With Adm. Bill Moran's abdication three weeks before he was due to become chief of naval operations, the Pentagon has yet another vacancy to fill with precious few days left before Congress goes on summer break.

As of Monday, a total of 20 top positions across the U.S. military are vacant, including defense secretary, Air Force secretary, and inspector general, said Heather Babb, a Pentagon spokeswoman.

Two officials have been confirmed by the Senate but have yet to assume their official duties: Christopher Scolese as director of the National Reconnaissance Office and Veronica Daigle as Assistant Defense Secretary for readiness, Babb said.


That leaves 18 top positions held by defense officials who are "acting" or otherwise temporarily filling those slots.

The Pentagon has not had full time defense secretary since Jan. 1, after James Mattis resigned in protest after disagreeing with President Donald Trump's decision to completely withdraw U.S. troops from Syria (Trump later backtracked).

Mark Esper has been serving as acting defense secretary since June 24. The Senate Armed Services Committee has not yet received his nomination to become the official defense secretary.

Trump announced on May 9 that he would formally nominate Patrick Shanahan as defense secretary, but Shanahan withdrew on June 18 amid media reports that he and his son had been involved in violent altercations with his former wife.

Things will get sporty when the White House sends Esper's nomination to the Senate. Due to an arcane law, Esper will have to step down as acting defense secretary while the Senate considers his nomination.

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer will likely be called upon to briefly serve as acting defense secretary until Esper is confirmed.

Here is a complete list of Defense Department positions being held by acting or temporary officials:

  • Secretary of Defense
  • Deputy Secretary of Defense
  • Chief Management Officer
  • Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness
  • Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness
  • Inspector General
  • Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation
  • Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense Programs
  • Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness
  • Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict
  • Director of the National Reconnaissance Office
  • Secretary of the Army
  • Undersecretary of the Army
  • Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installations, and Environment
  • General Counsel of the Department of the Navy
  • Secretary of the Air Force
  • Undersecretary of the Air Force

SEE ALSO: Read Secretary Mattis' Letter Of Resignation

WATCH NEXT: Patrick Shanahan Withdraws From Consideration For Defense Secretary

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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