Trump says the US military has super weapons that are even bigger and better than its nuclear arsenal

Analysis
Trump: North Korea 'Will Be Met With Fire And Fury'

President Donald Trump has appeared to double down on his claim that the U.S. military's arsenal includes conventional weapons that are more powerful than nukes.

While commemorating the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks Wednesday at the Pentagon, the president warned terrorists that they would be obliterated if they attacked the United States again.

"If, for any reason, they come back to our country, we will go wherever they are and use power the likes of which the United States has never used before," Trump said. "And I'm not even talking about nuclear power. They will have never seen anything like what will happen to them."


This is at least the second time in as many months that the president has asserted the U.S. military does not need to use nuclear weapons to wreak destruction on a scale not seen since God whacked Sodom and Gomorrah.

On Aug. 20, Trump repeated his talking point that the U.S. military could kill 10 million people in Afghanistan within a week, adding "this is not using nuclear [weapons]."

As of Wednesday, it was not immediately clear which super-weapons Trump referred to in both instances. Neither the White House nor the Pentagon provided a comment for this story.

Nuclear arms control expert Jon Wolfsthal, who served as a special assistant to former President Barack Obama from 2014 to 2017, raised the possibility that Trump does not know what he is talking about.

"Nuclear weapons remain the most powerful weapons in the US military arsenal," Wolfsthal told Task & Purpose on Wednesday. "While we have a vast array of conventional military weapons and many means of delivery, none come even close to the explosive or destructive power associated with our nuclear arsenal."

"I will assume that this is consistent with the president consistent effort to say anything he does is better, smarter, stronger, bigger than anyone else, but is not based on any facts or real world assessment," Wolfstahl continued.

Trump has been known for making bellicose statements. Before his rapprochement with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, the president had threatened to subject the rogue communist regime to "fire and fury."

More recently, the president has denied a story by Axios reporters Jonathan Swan and Margaret Talev that Trump suggested exploding a nuclear weapon inside a hurricane to dissipate the storm.

The Air Force is not currently exploring the feasibility of using nuclear bombs or missiles to destroy hurricanes, according to Military.com reporter Oriana Pawlyk.

Chief Master Sgt. Jason Morehouse. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Liberty.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg has called on the security alliance's allies to maintain and strengthen their "unity," saying the organization is "the only guarantor of European and transatlantic security."

Stoltenberg told reporters on November 19 that NATO "has only grown stronger over the last 70 years" despite "differences" among the allies on issues such as trade, climate, the Iran nuclear deal, and the situation in northeastern Syria.

He was speaking at the alliance's headquarters in Brussels on the eve of a NATO foreign ministers meeting aimed at finalizing preparations for next month's summit in London.

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An aerial view of the Pentagon building in Washington, June 15, 2005. (Reuters/Jason Reed JIR/CN)

WASHINGTON — More than $35 million of the roughly $400 million in aid to Ukraine that President Donald Trump delayed, sparking the impeachment inquiry, has not been released to the country, according to a Pentagon spending document obtained by the Los Angeles Times.

Instead, the defense funding for Ukraine remains in U.S. accounts, according to the document. It's not clear why the money hasn't been released, and members of Congress are demanding answers.

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Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

The admiral in charge of Navy special operators will decide whether to revoke the tridents for Eddie Gallagher and other SEALs involved in the Navy's failed attempt to prosecute Gallagher for murder, a defense official said Tuesday.

The New York Times' David Philipps first reported on Tuesday that the Navy could revoke the SEAL tridents for Gallagher as well as his former platoon commander Lt. Jacob Portier and two other SEALs: Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch and Lt. Thomas MacNeil.

The four SEALs will soon receive a letter that they have to appear before a board that will consider whether their tridents should be revoked, a defense official told Task & Purpose on condition of anonymity.

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