White supremacist Coast Guard officer stockpiled firearms and hit list of Democrats for mass terror attack

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A Coast Guard lieutenant arrested this week planned to "murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country," according to a court filing requesting he be detained until his trial.


Lt. Christopher Hasson, a self-identified white supremacist for "30 plus years," was arrested on Feb. 15 for firearm possession and for simple possession of Tramadol, according to the documents which were first reported by Seamus Hughes from George Washington University's Program on Extremism — charges that were the "proverbial tip of the iceberg,' U.S. Attorney Robert Hur said in the court filing.

A search of Hasson's home revealed 15 firearms and over 1,000 rounds of ammo along with a hit list of targets that included including prominent Democratic politicians — including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelsoi, Democratic newcomer Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — and media personalities like MSNBC's Joe Scarborough and Chris Hayes.

The cache of firearms discovered in Coast Guard Lt. Christopher Hasson's Maryland home(U.S. Attorney's Office in Maryland)

The same day that he made the list on his computer, he searched on Google "best place in dc to see congress people." About two hours later, he searched "civil war if trump impeached."

In a draft email that he deleted, Hasson wrote that "[l]iberalist/globalist ideology is destroying traditional people esp white." He said that he was "dreaming of a way to kill almost every last person on the earth," but that he needed get off the opioid Tramadol first.

Law enforcement also found a draft letter Hasson wrote to a neo-Nazi leader weeks after the 2017 Charlottesville white supremacist rally, in which he called for a "white homeland."

Hasson was assigned to work at Coast Guard headquarters in 2016 and previously served in the Marine Corps from 1988 to 1993, the documents state.

U.S. Coast Guard spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Scott McBride confirmed to Military.com that an "active-duty Coast Guard member stationed at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C., was arrested last week... Because this is an open investigation, the Coast Guard has no further details at this time."

Read the filing below:

SEE ALSO: Coast Guard Officer Punished For Flashing White Supremacist Symbol On National TV

Georgia Army National Guard Soldiers board an aircraft to begin the first leg of their deployment in support of Operation Freedom's Sentinel. (Georgia National Guard/Maj. William Carraway)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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