Special Operations Marine Charged With Allegedly Punching His Girlfriend 'Multiple Times'

news
Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested on Jan. 29, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Wilmington Police Department, North Carolina.)

A special operations Marine is due in court on March 7 after being arrested last year for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend, Task & Purpose has learned.

Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested and charged with assault inflicting serious injury on July 29, 2018, according to Jennifer Dandron, a spokeswoman for police in Wilmington, North Carolina. Evans is currently assigned as a Critical Skills Operator with the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, according to the Marine Corps Personnel Locator.


Wilmington Police took Evans into custody after responding to domestic assault, according to the police report, which was provided to Task & Purpose.

"Upon arrival, the victim was located with several injuries," the report said. "She explained to officers on scene that Evans had punched her multiple times after asking him to leave the residence. Evans was arrested and charged with Assault Inflicting Serious Injury and was given no bond until his first appearance in court."

Evans spent one day in jail and was released on July 30, 2018 after posting $5,000 secured bail, according to the New Hanover County Sheriff's Office.

Police confirmed the alleged victim was Kimberly Rhine, who recently posted on Facebook that she had asked Evans to leave after claiming that she found he had been unfaithful during his seven-month deployment.

"My BF then punched me in the face completely knocking me off my feet," Rhine posted. "My 6'3, 230+ LB. MARSOC operator boyfriend ... split open my face."

Now prosecutors are trying to strike a plea deal with Evans because this is allegedly his first offense, Rhine wrote.

Sam Dooies, an assistant to the New Hanover County District Attorney, declined to comment on the status of the case.

"We are not permitted to comment on a pending case," Dooies told Task & Purpose on Friday. "Mr. Evans' next scheduled court date is March 7, but the case could be resolved sooner than that."

Dooies said Evans could face up to 16 months in prison on the assault charge, but such a sentence could be suspended.

MARSOC issued a statement on Friday confirming that a member of the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion is "accused of several crimes related to an alleged altercation in July 2018" without naming Evans.

"This case is currently being handled as a civilian criminal justice matter which the command is following closely in order to be able to take future command actions following the outcome of his civilian case," the statement says. "The command has taken administrative actions to include issuing a military protective order and a reassignment of duties.

"These will remain in place while the case is ongoing. Additional legal requirements may be in place under civilian jurisdiction authority. MARSOC takes all allegations of misconduct seriously, cooperates fully with investigative authorities and takes corrective action on behavior that does not conform to DoD standards."

Rhine wrote on Facebook that she continues to suffer pain and partial loss of eyesight from her injuries. She also wrote that prosecutors initially told her they would offer Evans a plea agreement because she had not suffered "grotesque disfigurement."

"My face was as she said not 'a Quasimodo disfigurement,'" Rhine posted. "I remember looking at her for the first time, in a meeting where she has never met me OR heard my story but had already offered a meager plea...through blood shot eyes telling her, you may not see what you feel to be a Quasimodo disfigurement, but it feels that way on the inside."

UPDATE: This story was updated at 5:20 P.M. on Jan. 18 with a MARSOC statement.

SEE ALSO: Marine In Hot Water For Claiming Men Are 'Biologically Designed' To Be Attracted To Young Girls

WATCH NEXT: The Women Veterans Battling PTSD

The U.S. military's withdrawal from northeast Syria is looking more like Dunkirk every day.

On Wednesday, the U.S. military had to call in an airstrike on one of its own ammunition dumps in northern Syria because the cargo trucks required to safely remove the ammo are needed elsewhere to support the withdrawal, Task & Purpose has learned.

Read More Show Less

Retired two-star Navy. Adm. Joe Sestak is the highest ranking — and perhaps, least known — veteran who is trying to clinch the Democratic nomination for president in 2020.

Sestak has decades of military experience, but he is not getting nearly as much media attention as fellow veterans Pete Buttigieg and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii). Another veteran, Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) has dropped out of the race.

Read More Show Less

After preliminary fitness test scores leaked in September, many have voiced concerns about how women would fare in the new Army Combat Fitness Test.

The scores — which accounted for 11 of the 63 battalions that the ACFT was tested on last year — showed an overall failure rate of 84% for women, and a 70% pass rate for men.

But Army leaders aren't concerned about this in the slightest.

Read More Show Less
This photo taken on Oct. 7, 2018, shows a billboard that reads "The State Central Navy Testing Range" near residential buildings in the village of Nyonoksa, northwestern Russia. The Aug. 8, 2019, explosion of a rocket engine at the Russian navy's testing range just outside Nyonoksa led to a brief spike in radiation levels and raised new questions about prospective Russian weapons. (AP Photo/Sergei Yakovlev)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Three U.S. diplomats have been removed from a train and briefly questioned by Russian authorities in the sensitive Arctic shipyard city of Severodvinsk, near the site of a mysterious explosion in August that killed five nuclear workers.

Russia's Interfax news agency reported on October 16 that the diplomats were taken off the train that runs between Severodvinsk and Nyonoksa around 6 p.m. on October 14.

Read More Show Less

The U.S. Coast Guard had ordered the owner of an illegal 45-foot charter boat, named "Sea You Twerk," to stop operating.

He didn't, the Coast Guard said.

Now, Dallas Lad, 38, will serve 30 days in federal prison, a judge ruled Friday. When he is released, Ladd of Miami Beach, who pleaded guilty, will not be able to own or go on a boat for three years.

Read More Show Less