The Soldier Who Allegedly Took A Joyride In An APC Live-Tweeted The Entire Incident

Code Red News
Joshua Yabut/Twitter

Virginia State Police arrested 1st Lt. Joshua Yabut, 29, on Tuesday after authorities say he fled from police in an M577 Armored Personnel Carrier that was stolen from Fort Pickett. The soldier was apparently taking part in routine training with the Virginia National Guard when he decided to take a little joy ride while allegedly "under the influence of drugs," the Guard said.


But before all of this, as it turns out, Yabut was tweeting some clues to his plan, and then later, a selfie to commemorate his legendary status (note: This Twitter account is unconfirmed, but it certainly looks to be Yabut's, given that he tweeted his full name, rank, DoD ID#, and other personal information in the weeks prior).

This is how it all went down.

That morning, he expressed optimism about the day's training:

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He retweets a few different accounts, to include this from the Virginia State Police, which, in light of the chase later that evening, perhaps should have also mentioned moving over for M577 Armored Personnel Carriers.

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About 30 minutes later, he tweets a Google Map featuring the Virginia State Capital and a screenshot of the Wikipedia page for an armored personnel carrier. Interesting.

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One minute later, he tweets about "executing the 0day" — an apparent reference to 0-Day exploits, a type of computer attack using a security vulnerability unknown to the target (his LinkedIn lists work in offensive cybersecurity for NASA).

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About an hour later, he tweets a link to the Army's Ground Risk Assessment Tool, for anyone who needs "resources for a tactical convoy movement," which is kind of hilarious in retrospect.

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He retweets a bunch of accounts in between, then Yabut is back with a few cryptic tweets:

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Then he retweets this:

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Just after noon, mere hours before an APC will go missing and be involved in a police chase, the 1st Lt. with 11 years in says he's thinking about getting out of the Army now:

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Whoa boy. Now he's taking pictures from inside the APC.

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And then:

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Then finally, it's LEROYYYYYYYYYYYY JENKINSSSSSSSSSSSS

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