The Recruit Who Shipped To Boot Camp With A Mullet Is Now A Marine

Bullet Points
MCRD San Diego/Facebook

Recruit Mullet is now Marine Mullet, a spokesman for the Corps’ west coast recruit training depot told Task & Purpose.


  • The Marine, whose name Task & Purpose is withholding, completed the Crucible on Aug. 2 and is expected to graduate from boot camp on Aug. 17, said Steve Posy, of Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego.

Related: Mullet-Wearing Marine Recruit Showed Up To Boot Camp Ready To Party »

  • The recently minted Marine shot to internet stardom in May when the Corps tweeted a picture of him showing up to boot camp with a magnificent mullet and a Budweiser t-shirt along with the caption, “Business in the Front, Party in the Back.”
  • His picture yielded nearly 7,000 comments on Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego’s Facebook page, including this one: “I’d like to think he skipped the bus ride to MCRD and pulled up burnin' rubber in his El Camino with Marlboro smoke pouring out the windows jamming to Skynyrd before he stepped out then shotgunned a Budweiser.”

Related: The Inside Story Of ‘Recruit Mullet,’ The Future Marine Here To Kick Ass And Drink Beer »

  • The young man’s uncle, who served in the Marines, told T&P; that he recommended that his nephew get a short haircut before arriving at boot camp, but the future Marine’s barber persuaded him to go full mullet.
  • “I told him he was already gonna get f****d with for the haircut in general,” said retired Gunnery Sgt. Mike Voorhees. “They’re gonna call you ‘Joe Dirt’ and ‘Mullet Man.’”
  • Welcome to the Corps Mullet Man!

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