UNC Charlotte shooting hero awarded posthumous ROTC Medal of Heroism

Unsung Heroes

Riley Howell, the Army ROTC cadet shot and killed while restraining an active shooter at UNC Charlotte on April 30, was posthumously awarded the ROTC Medal of Heroism earlier this month for his heroic sacrifice, the Army announced.


Howell "protected his fellow classmates by tackling the suspect and using his body as a human shield. His actions that day left him mortally wounded, but he saved an undeterminable amount of lives," his award summary reads. "Mr. Howell demonstrated the values of the United States Army by showing a high level of integrity, honor, and selfless service on that fateful day."

Howell's family received the award in a private ceremony at UNC Charlotte on May 11, less than a week after the 21-year-old was buried with full military honors just a few miles away from his hometown of Waynesville, North Carolina.

While Howell was apparently not contracted to become an Army officer after graduation, according to the service, UNC Charlotte professor Lt. Col. Chunka Smith said the fallen cadet "embodied everything we look for in future officers."

"Though our time with Riley was brief, I can tell you that he stood out. I make it a point to shake the hands of all 180 Cadets in our program," Smith said. "All of them are phenomenal men and women, but Riley stood out because of his strong, tall, athletic build and his overall calm presence."

"Each year 180 plus Army ROTC students will know the story of Riley Howell and the sacrifice he made," he added. "They will carry and spread the legacy of Riley Howell."

Riley Howell
Photo: Lee County Sheriff's Office/Facebook

An Alabama woman was charged in the shooting death of her husband, an Army sergeant stationed at Fort Benning, just days after he filed for a restraining order against her.

Read More Show Less

U.S. Cyber Command is reportedly going on offense against Russia's power grid by placing "potentially crippling malware" in its systems, The New York Times reported Saturday.

The cyber incursions, authorized to Cyber Command under new authorities that do not require presidential approval, have gotten more "aggressive" and seem to be a warning that the U.S. can respond to Moscow's past cyberattacks, such as the 2016 incursion into the Democratic National Committee and its attack on Ukraine's power grid.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

A Chicago veteran missed his graduation day in 1944 serving in World War II. But on Thursday, he walked across the stage, officially graduating with the Class of 2019.

Read More Show Less
REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File Photo

DUBAI/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States on Friday blamed Iran for attacks on two oil tankers at the entrance to the Gulf and said it was seeking international consensus about the threat to shipping, despite Tehran denying involvement in the explosions at sea.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Navy photo)

The Navy has named a female president of the U.S. Naval War College for the first time in its history just days after ousting her predecessor amid allegations of excess spending and inappropriate behavior.

Read More Show Less