Air Force Fires Commander Of Security Unit That Lost Grenades, Machine Gun

Bullet Points
U.S. Air Force / Airman 1st Class Jonathan McElderry.

The commander of the Air Force security unit that lost a machine gun and grenades has been fired, officials announced on Wednesday.


  • Col. Jason Beers was relieved on Wednesday as commander of the 91st Security Forces Group at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, “due to a loss of trust and confidence after a series of events under the scope of his leadership, including a recent loss of ammunition and weapons,” a 5th Bomb Wing news release says.
  • On May 1, the security forces unit lost a box of 40mm MK 19 grenades, which fell off the back of a military vehicle. Then, on May 16, an M240 machine gun turned up missing during a standard inventory check.
  • Following the two incidents, Global Strike Command, which is in charge of all of the Air Force’s nuclear missiles and bombers, ordered a command-wide weapons inventory for all airmen, not just security forces.
  • The 91st Security Forces group is tasked with safeguarding 150 Minuteman III nuclear missiles and launch facilities and 15 missile alert facilities, according to the 5th Bomb Wing.

So far, neither the missing machine gun nor the grenades have been found, said wing spokesman Lt. Col. Jamie Humphries, who added there is still a $5,000 reward for the missing grenades. Anyone with pertinent information regarding the missing rounds should contact Air Force Office of Special Investigations at (701)-723-7909.

WATCH NEXT:

US Marine Corps

Former Marine Commandant Gen. Charles Krulak has issued a statement urging President Donald Trump and members of Congress to oppose pardons for those accused or convicted of war crimes since, he argued, it would "relinquish the United States' moral high ground."

"If President Trump follows through on reports that he will mark Memorial Day by pardoning individuals accused or convicted of war crimes, he will betray these ideals and undermine decades of precedent in American military justice that has contributed to making our country's fighting forces the envy of the world," said Krulak, who served in the Marine Corps for more than three decades before retiring in 1999 as the 31st Commandant.

Read More Show Less

President Donald Trump will nominate Barbara Barrett to serve as the next Air Force secretary, the president announced on Tuesday.

"I am pleased to announce my nomination of Barbara Barrett of Arizona, and former Chairman of the Aerospace Corporation, to be the next Secretary of the Air Force," Trump tweeted. "She will be an outstanding Secretary! #FlyFightWin"

Read More Show Less

The Trump administration is trying to assure Congress that it does not want to start a war with Iran, but some lawmakers who fought in Iraq are not so sure.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford both briefed Congress on Tuesday about Iran. Shanahan told reporters earlier on Tuesday that the U.S. military buildup in the region has stopped Iran and its proxies from attacking U.S. forces, but the crisis is not yet over.

"We've put on hold the potential for attacks on Americans," Shanahan said. "That doesn't mean that the threats that we've previously identified have gone away. Our prudent response, I think, has given the Iranians time to recalculate. I think our response was a measure of our will and our resolve that we will protect our people and our interests in the region."

Read More Show Less
U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brian M. Wilbur/Handout via REUTERS

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump warned on Monday Iran would be met with "great force" if it attacked U.S. interests in the Middle East, and government sources said Washington strongly suspects Shi'ite militias with ties to Tehran were behind a rocket attack in Baghdad's Green Zone.

"I think Iran would be making a very big mistake if they did anything," Trump told reporters as he left the White House on Monday evening for an event in Pennsylvania. "If they do something, it will be met with great force but we have no indication that they will."

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army photo)

After a year and a half since the Army took delivery on the first of its souped-up new version of the M1 Abrams main battle tank, the Pentagon's Joint Systems Manufacturing Center in Lima, Ohio is ramping up to deliver the service's first full brigade of upgraded warhorses to bring the pain downrange.

Read More Show Less