Pentagon identifies Marine Raider killed in Iraq

news

Gunnery Sgt. Scott Koppenhafer was killed Aug. 10 during combat operations in Iraq.

U.S. Marine Corps

The Department of Defense has identified a Marine Raider who was killed in action over the weekend in Iraq.

On Aug. 10, 2019 Marine Gunnery Sgt. Scott A. Koppenhafer, 35, was killed after "being engaged by enemy small arms fire while conducting combat operations" in support of Iraqi Security Forces according to an Aug. 11 statement from the Pentagon. The incident remains under investigation.

He is survived by his wife and two children


Koppenhafer was assigned to 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, Marine Forces Special Operations Command, on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Originally from Mancos, Colorado, Koppenhafer joined the Marines in 2005 and served as a MARSOC critical skills operator for the last 10 years, according to a MARSOC news release. Prior to joining MARSOC, Koppenhafer was a machine gunner with 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, and later a scout sniper, who deployed with both the 31st and 11th Marine Expeditionary Units.

In 2009 Koppenhafer graduated the Individual Training Course as the honor graduate and was meritoriously promoted to staff sergeant during his first MARSOC deployment to Afghanistan. He went on to complete three more deployments with 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, and was selected as 2018's Critical Skills Operator of the year.

His personal awards include: two Bronze Star Medals with "V"; two Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals with "V"; one Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal; two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals; one Humanitarian Service Medal; two Combat Action Ribbons; four Good Conduct Medals; the National Defense Service Medal; the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal; the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; and six Sea Service Deployment Ribbons.

In addition to his training as an infantry Marine, Koppenhafer was a graduate of numerous advanced schools from Mountain Survival Course; to Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE); Scout Sniper Course; MARSOF Advanced Sniper Course; Basic Airborne Course; Military Freefall; MARSOF Heliborne Insertion/Extraction Techniques Master; and Military Combatant Diver Course. Additionally, in 2005, Koppenhafer graduated from Adams State College in Alamosa, Colorado with a Bachelors of Science in Business Marketing.

Jason Venne (Hampden Superior Court)

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. — A woman has filed a civil suit against a former member of the 104th Fighter Wing of the Air National Guard, saying she has suffered emotional distress and "a diminished capacity to enjoy life" in the years since he used a hidden camera at Barnes Air National Guard Base to record explicit images of her.

Former Tech Sgt. Jason Venne, 37, pleaded guilty in February to six counts of photographing an unsuspecting person in the nude and seven counts of unlawful wiretap. He admitted putting a camera in the women's locker room at the Westfield base, recording images and video between 2011 and 2013 when he worked there as a mechanic.

Read More Show Less
(DoD photo)

Five people have been indicted in federal court in the Western District of Texas on charges of participating in a scheme to steal millions of dollars from benefits reserved for military members, U.S. Department of Justice officials said Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
In this March 24, 2017, photo, bottles of hemp oil, or CBD, are for sale at the store Into The Mystic in Mission, Kansas. (Associated Press/The Kansas City Star/Allison Long)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

As the military services each roll out new policies regarding hemp-derived products like cannabidiol, or CBD, the Defense Department is not mincing words.

"It's completely forbidden for use by any service member in any of the services at this point of time," said Patricia Deuster, director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland.

The warning, along with the policies issued recently by the Air Force, Coast Guard and Department of the Navy, comes as CBD is becoming increasingly ubiquitous across the country in many forms, from coffee additives and vaping liquids to tinctures, candies and other foods, carrying promises of health benefits ranging from pain and anxiety relief to sleeping aids and inflammation reduction.

Read More Show Less

The Navy has fired five senior leaders so far in August – and the month isn't even over.

While the sea service is famous for instilling in officers that they are responsible for any wrongdoing by their sailors – whether they are aware of the infractions or not – the recent rash of firings is a lot, even for the Navy.

A Navy spokesman said there is no connection between any of the five officers relieved of command, adding that each relief is looked at separately.

Read More Show Less
Then-Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville. (U.S. Army/Spc. Matthew J. Marcellus)

After months of focusing on modernization priorities, Army leadership plans to tackle persisting personnel issues in the coming years.

Acting Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said Tuesday at an event with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies that what people can to hear service leadership "talk a lot about ... our people. Investing in our people, so that they can reach their potential. ... We are a people organization."

Read More Show Less