US forces in South Korea only made it a month without a curfew before a soldier got drunk and stole a taxi

news
Making Strike Force Energy Cocktails

A soldier stationed in South Korea has landed himself exactly where every soldier in South Korea doesn't want to be — on the commanding general of U.S. Forces Korea's radar.


A messaged posted by U.S. Army WTF Moments on July 20th says that an "underage soldier" assaulted a taxi driver and stole the vehicle after a night of drinking, resulting in him getting tased. Per the message, the soldier is facing "charges of Assault, Robbery, DUI, and underage drinking," but public affairs officer for the 2nd Infantry Division, Lt. Col. Martyn Crighton, told Task & Purpose it is still under investigation.

"We are aware of the incident involving a U.S. Soldier and Korean National Police in Itaewon last weekend and are cooperating fully with all legal authorities," Crighton said. "We take this matter very seriously. We are committed to ensuring our Soldiers obey Korean laws, U.S. military regulations and remain good neighbors with the Korean community."

Gen. Robert Abrams tweeted on Sunday that U.S. troops in Korea are "Ambassadors who represent our country on and off duty," reminding the soldiers under his command that they are "guests here."

This comes just weeks after Gen. Robert Abrams decided to temporarily lift troops' curfew in Korea.

Things had been going smoothly, according to Brig. Gen. Patrick Donahoe, who told Task & Purpose in a previous interview earlier this month that it had thus far been a "pleasant surprise" with the curfew lifted.

Leadership in Korea has been on a mission to improve the quality of life for soldiers by cutting through the bureaucratic red tape so often installed by the U.S. military — one of those steps was suspending the curfew.

So in other words: Don't fuck it up for everyone else.

Editor's Note: This story has been updated to include comment from Lt. Col. Martyn Crighton.

SEE NEXT: 'If It's Not Easy, Make It Easy:' Us Army Leadership In Korea Is Sick Of The Bureaucratic Bs

WATCH ALSO: The B-1B Lancer With South Korean And Japanese Fighters

Soldiers deploy concertina wire in a location along the Southwest border of the United States near Hidalgo, Texas. U.S. Army North is deployed to the southwest border under the authority of U.S. Northern Command to support the Department of Homeland Security and the Customs and Border Protection's mission to secure the border. (U.S. Customs and Border Patrol)

The Defense Department's Inspector General's Office has launched an "evaluation" of the deployment of active-duty and National Guard troops to the southern border, a news release said Tuesday.

"We will examine, among other issues, what they are doing at the border, what training they received, and whether their use complied with applicable law, DoD policy, and operating guidance," said Glenn Fine, the principal deputy inspector general performing the duties of the inspector general, in the release.

Read More Show Less
(DoD photo)

Gold Star family members might finally see an end to the so-called "Widows Tax" thanks to the National Defense Authorization Act of 2020.

Read More Show Less
Saudi Arabia Defense Attache Major General Fawaz Al Fawaz and his Embassy staff and other officials arrive to meet with the Saudi students who remain restricted to the Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola base by their Saudi commanding officer, in Pensacola, Florida, U.S. December 9, 2019.( FBI Jacksonville/Handout via Reuters)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Nearly 175 Saudi Arabian military aviation students have been grounded as part of a "safety stand-down" after a Saudi Air Force lieutenant shot and killed three people last week at a U.S. Navy base in Florida, U.S. officials told Reuters on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Photo: U.S. Army/Spc. Valencia McNeal

The number of substantiated allegations of sexual misconduct against senior Army officials increased this year, according to an Army Inspector General report recently presented to service leaders and obtained by Task & Purpose.

The document, which lays out broad details of IG investigations undertaken in fiscal year 2019, looks at investigations specific to senior Army officials, which includes "promotable colonels, general officers and senior executives," according to Army spokesman Lt. Col. Emanuel Ortiz.

Read More Show Less
A U.S. Marine with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) carries cold weather equipment as he begins to march across the Icelandic terrain October 19, 2018. (U.S. Air Force/Capt. Kylee Ashton)

MONS, Belgium (Reuters) - The United States will send 20,000 troops to Europe next April and May in its biggest military exercises on European soil since the Cold War to underscore Washington's commitment to NATO, a senior allied commander said on Tuesday.

Days after a NATO summit in London at which U.S. President Donald Trump called low-spending European allies "delinquent", U.S. Major General Barre Seguin said the exercises, centered on Germany, will be the largest of their kind in 25 years.

"This really demonstrates transatlantic unity and the U.S. commitment to NATO," Seguin, who oversees allied operations from NATO's military headquarters in Belgium, told Reuters.

Read More Show Less